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 2018 SFAI MFA Exhibition  As the culminating event of its inaugural year at Fort Mason, SFAI gives the Bay Area public a chance to discover the next Kehinde Wiley or Annie Leibovitz at its annual graduate exhibition. More than 60 MFA artists will transform SFAI’s new Fort Mason Campus into a dynamic, large-scale gallery of contemporary installations, painting, sound, video, sculpture, photography, printmaking, performance, and more.    On view:  May 11–17 | 11am–7pm* Free + Open to All     *Show will close at 4pm on May 13th for a private event.    #SFAIGradX

2018 SFAI MFA Exhibition

As the culminating event of its inaugural year at Fort Mason, SFAI gives the Bay Area public a chance to discover the next Kehinde Wiley or Annie Leibovitz at its annual graduate exhibition. More than 60 MFA artists will transform SFAI’s new Fort Mason Campus into a dynamic, large-scale gallery of contemporary installations, painting, sound, video, sculpture, photography, printmaking, performance, and more.


On view: May 11–17 | 11am–7pm*
Free + Open to All

 

*Show will close at 4pm on May 13th for a private event. 


#SFAIGradX

 Letgo is an ongoing photography project/social experiment that I have been doing since 2015 until now. In my old apartment, people would leave unwanted objects by the elevator door, I would take these things home and take a studio photo of it, then put it back to where it was, then it will soon to be passed on to its next owner. After I moved, I started using the App "Letgo" as my sources. I collect free things from different people from the App, take a photo of it, then post it again with the new photo for other people to take it away from me (some of them I have kept). During this process, I'm documenting each meeting, either its a quick drop by, or an invite to the inside of people's places for an extensive conversation. I believe that objects, with the memories and histories attached to them, are very powerful beings. Instead of dump it in the trash, people actually takes the time to post, and give it to a stranger for free, it says something truly valuable about these "unwanted objects". In this process of inheriting, me being one of the owner, is also the passenger and recorder.   The Still Lights Gallery is located at 800 Chestnut St, San Francisco, CA 94133. The show will be up from March 18-24th. 

Letgo is an ongoing photography project/social experiment that I have been doing since 2015 until now. In my old apartment, people would leave unwanted objects by the elevator door, I would take these things home and take a studio photo of it, then put it back to where it was, then it will soon to be passed on to its next owner. After I moved, I started using the App "Letgo" as my sources. I collect free things from different people from the App, take a photo of it, then post it again with the new photo for other people to take it away from me (some of them I have kept). During this process, I'm documenting each meeting, either its a quick drop by, or an invite to the inside of people's places for an extensive conversation. I believe that objects, with the memories and histories attached to them, are very powerful beings. Instead of dump it in the trash, people actually takes the time to post, and give it to a stranger for free, it says something truly valuable about these "unwanted objects". In this process of inheriting, me being one of the owner, is also the passenger and recorder. 

The Still Lights Gallery is located at 800 Chestnut St, San Francisco, CA 94133. The show will be up from March 18-24th. 

 On May 4, 1699, Gulliver set sail from England to the South Sea. Driven by a violent storm, Gulliver made his first voyage to Lilliput, an island inhabited by tiny people. Lilliput is an intersection of fantasy and reality - although its residents are only one-twelfth the height of ordinary human beings, they are as small and petty as the normal man.   Curated by Yang Bao, this exhibition features four artists who create their Lilliput: Henry Chambers,  Yan Huang ,  Joshua Zachary Mintz , and  Tomy Yan . Humorous and irreverent, their playful art is a distorting mirror of the reality. The context of everyday life doesn’t stay, and the border between real and unreal is not fixed.   If reality is the state of things as they exist, and if it’s what you see, hear, and experience, when watching the absurdity happen every day in this “real” world, have you ever doubted if it is still the “real” world you believe? Are most people living in a fantasy world in any case? By folding fact into fiction, reality is mysterious and elusive. Indeed, in Lilliput, reality can be reached only through fabrication and imagination.  The Swell Gallery is located on the first floor of SFAI's Fort Mason Campus at Pier 2, 2 Marina Boulevard.  Image:  Dollhouse , Tomy Yan

On May 4, 1699, Gulliver set sail from England to the South Sea. Driven by a violent storm, Gulliver made his first voyage to Lilliput, an island inhabited by tiny people. Lilliput is an intersection of fantasy and reality - although its residents are only one-twelfth the height of ordinary human beings, they are as small and petty as the normal man. 

Curated by Yang Bao, this exhibition features four artists who create their Lilliput: Henry Chambers, Yan HuangJoshua Zachary Mintz, and Tomy Yan. Humorous and irreverent, their playful art is a distorting mirror of the reality. The context of everyday life doesn’t stay, and the border between real and unreal is not fixed. 

If reality is the state of things as they exist, and if it’s what you see, hear, and experience, when watching the absurdity happen every day in this “real” world, have you ever doubted if it is still the “real” world you believe? Are most people living in a fantasy world in any case? By folding fact into fiction, reality is mysterious and elusive. Indeed, in Lilliput, reality can be reached only through fabrication and imagination.

The Swell Gallery is located on the first floor of SFAI's Fort Mason Campus at Pier 2, 2 Marina Boulevard.

Image: Dollhouse, Tomy Yan

 THIS MESSAGE HAS NO CONTENT  Opening Reception, Friday February 2nd, 6-9pm  The term “THIS MESSAGE HAS NO CONTENT” originates from an error message in an email preview when the Mail App on iPhone and iPad devices does not fully download a message or when the message only contains an image with no text. Digitally mediated communication has come to dictate the interpersonal space of our present. It is also often how we present ourselves to others. From the narcissism of the selfie to the intimacy fabricated through Skype, Facebook, and Craigslist, to the manipulated language used to define our sense of reality of the world and ourselves, this exhibition seeks to explore the insatiable consumption, marketing-centric representation, and vapidly fragmented social interaction of contemporary culture.  "Tomy Chuhe Yan (SFAI) believes emojis are more than just signs, they are a reflection of our social world, and they have multiple meanings. By looking at emojis, Yan is seeing a lot of changes in our society and how that relates to our sense of personal identity as well as our sense of otherness.   Participating Artists:   Dave Beeman // CCA  Lizzy Blasingame // SF State  Kira Dominguez // CCA  T2R/Laura Gilmore // CCA  Izidora LETHE // SFAI  Ryan Meyer // UC Davis  tamara suarez porras // CCA  Connie Woo // SFAI  Tomy Chuhe Yan // SFAI

THIS MESSAGE HAS NO CONTENT

Opening Reception, Friday February 2nd, 6-9pm

The term “THIS MESSAGE HAS NO CONTENT” originates from an error message in an email preview when the Mail App on iPhone and iPad devices does not fully download a message or when the message only contains an image with no text. Digitally mediated communication has come to dictate the interpersonal space of our present. It is also often how we present ourselves to others. From the narcissism of the selfie to the intimacy fabricated through Skype, Facebook, and Craigslist, to the manipulated language used to define our sense of reality of the world and ourselves, this exhibition seeks to explore the insatiable consumption, marketing-centric representation, and vapidly fragmented social interaction of contemporary culture.

"Tomy Chuhe Yan (SFAI) believes emojis are more than just signs, they are a reflection of our social world, and they have multiple meanings. By looking at emojis, Yan is seeing a lot of changes in our society and how that relates to our sense of personal identity as well as our sense of otherness.

Participating Artists:

Dave Beeman // CCA

Lizzy Blasingame // SF State

Kira Dominguez // CCA

T2R/Laura Gilmore // CCA

Izidora LETHE // SFAI

Ryan Meyer // UC Davis

tamara suarez porras // CCA

Connie Woo // SFAI

Tomy Chuhe Yan // SFAI